How To Care

Having truly sustainable garment care practices starts from shopping for an item to how often you wear it, to washing it, to storing it, and finally, mending or disposing of it.

Think of it as the life cycle of a garment. If you’ve ever had a question about caring for your clothes, this guide is here to help!

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How To Care

Having truly sustainable garment care practices starts from shopping for an item to how often you wear it, to washing it, to storing it, and finally, mending or disposing of it.

Think of it as the life cycle of a garment. If you’ve ever had a question about caring for your clothes, this guide is here to help!

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Linen

Linen becomes softer and more absorbent after each wash, pretty neat huh? Wash linen on gentle machine cycle and low temperatures - cold or lukewarm water. Feel free to machine (tumble) dry your linen clothes or textile, as long as you stick to low temperatures. Remove from the dryer when still slightly damp and hang or lie flat to finish off the drying process.

There really is no need to iron linen garments, unless they have become really crushed.

Cotton

Cotton is a cellulose fibre that comes from Gossypium, the cotton plant. Items that are 100% cotton can shrink easily; to avoid this, make sure to wash in cold or lukewarm water, and spot-treat any stains before washing. When you take a cotton item out of the washing machine, gently shake it to avoid deep wrinkles, and immediately hang or lay flat to air-dry. Do not tumble dry pure cotton.

If the item does get wrinkled, use a steamer or, if necessary, an iron.

 

Recycled Polyester

Polyester can easily be washed and dried, making it very easy to care for. Machine wash polyester using the permanent press cycle and warm water wash. The fabric has a tendency to be stiff so you may want to add fabric softener during the rinse cycle to give it a softer feel and reduce static electricity. Dry polyester on low heat setting in your dryer, or hang on a clothes line to air dry in warmer weather.

  • Typically, polyester does not require ironing, but if it’s necessary, use a warm iron.

 

Blended Textile

Many materials are blends of two types of fibers, perhaps cotton and linen. It’s most important to pay attention to the most sensitive fiber in the blend. For example, does it contain cotton, wool, or silk? If so, try to care for it as if it were entirely made of that fabric in order to best preserve it.

The care label will give you information about the fibers in the material.

How often should I wash my clothes?

As little as possible! This will differ for everyone. It depends on how you wear your clothes, how much you typically sweat, and the fabric of the garment, among other things. Many people wash their garments too regularly. If it’s not soiled to the point of requiring a wash, re-wear your item.

Spot cleaning can prevent unnecessary laundry loads. Furthermore, using natural products can reduce the reliance upon detergents. Some great household alternatives include lemon, which can help to scrub the underarms of garments and baking soda, which can help with spot stain removal.

Care Tips

#1 Use Cold Water

Selecting cold water in a wash cycle saves energy. This has other benefits for clothing, such as retaining colour fastness (material's colour resistance to fading or running) and reducing shrinkage - both of which lead to longer lasting garments and therefore means there is less of a need for new garments!

#2 Counteract Microfibres

Modern garments are often manufactured from a range of synthetic fibres such as polyester, polyamide, acrylic and nylon. When these garments are washed, millions of plastic microfibres are shed.

Use A Guppy Friend bag that can be placed in your machine to collect any microfibres that try to go astray. This product has been scientifically proven to prevent microfibres from entering our waterways.

#3 Hang Clothes Straight Away

The water retained in your freshly washed garments can help to eradicate wrinkles, lessening the need for ironing.

Water in a garment pulls down and out of the fabrication, using gravity to remove wrinkles. When drying fabrications such as linen, don’t do a final spin, instead leave some water in the garment creating more ‘pull power’ to expel those wrinkles.

The best way to get rid of old clothes

Keep your clothes for as long as possible. Sometimes, of course, an item can no longer be worn, or you simply know you won’t get further use from it.

If an item is still wearable, give it to a friend, take it to a consignment store, donate it to a thrift shop, or repurpose it.

If the garment is no longer wearable, recycle it. This doesn’t just mean dumping it in your nearest second-hand bin. Instead, find a service in your area that recycles textiles.

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